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Most Terrifying Foods in the World November 30, 2007

Posted by Retired Geezer in Man Laws.
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I’m afraid of expired milk, lime jello and Tuna Casserole. Guess I’ve led a sheltered life.

From:
Norway.

What the hell is it?
Ahhh, Lutefisk. After the larvae-ridden cheese, it’s a blessed relief to sample a clean, down-to-earth Scandinavian recipe.

A little too clean.

Lutefisk is a traditional Norwegian dish featuring cod that has been steeped for many days in a solution of lye, until its flesh is caustic enough to dissolve silver cutlery.

Wait, it gets worse …
For those of you who don’t know, lye (potassium hydroxide/sodium hydroxide) is a powerful industrial chemical used for cleaning drains, killing plants, de-budding cow horns, powering batteries and manufacturing biodiesel. Contact with lye can cause chemical burns, permanent scarring, blindness or total deliciousness, depending on whether you pour it onto a herring or your own face. Or, so the lutefisk industry would have us believe.

The 6 Most Terrifying Foods in the World

Comments»

1. eddiebear - November 30, 2007

What about Head Cheese?

2. See-dub - November 30, 2007

I’ve had the mouse wine.

3. Mr Minority - November 30, 2007

The crap that people think as food astounds me.

I’d eat that Scandi fish before I ate that Italian maggot infested cheese.

4. daveintexas - November 30, 2007

*shudders and remembers the duck soup in Taipei*

5. daveintexas - November 30, 2007

DUCK SOUP

6. eddiebear - November 30, 2007

My MIL’s cooking scares me.

7. kevlarchick - November 30, 2007

And you crybabies bitch about a little Skyline chili.

8. Sobek - November 30, 2007

I have a Danish food cookbook at home, and probably about 85% of the recipes in there look unspeakably disgusting. I assume it’s because Denmark, like the rest of Europe (and, for the most part, unlike America) has developed centuries of traditions during centuries where a lot of people starved to death. As a result, Europeans don’t really embrace the idea that God never intended some parts of the animal for human consumption.

Some parts of the cow, you just throw away.

FWIW, the cheese isn’t all that bad. It has a sharp, tangy taste and a creamy texture. You can buy it (without the worms) in Sardinian grocery stores. I ate it old-school style, scooped out of a giant jar in some old man’s house, where he made it himself (and, I wager, without much input from the Italian version of the Food and Drug Administration).

9. daveintexas - November 30, 2007

I wasn’t “bitching” I was critiquing.

Huge diff.

10. Retired Geezer - November 30, 2007

…has developed centuries of traditions during centuries where a lot of people starved to death. As a result, Europeans don’t really embrace the idea that God never intended some parts of the animal for human consumption.

I think you’ve hit upon the real reason why people eat that crap.

Why don’t they eat Cake?

Or Pie?

11. Mr Minority - November 30, 2007

Or Pie?

Dave likes Pie!

12. sandy burger - November 30, 2007

I’m disturbed by mayonaise. That stuff is everywhere, I’m serious. People cannot possibly want it on all their food; the powerful Mayonaise Lobby must be behind it. President Eisenhower tried to warn us about Big Mayo, but nobody listened…

13. Eisenhower - November 30, 2007

Thank you! Finally somebody believes me!

14. Mr Minority - November 30, 2007

Hmmmmmm, warm Mayo.

15. mesablue - November 30, 2007

Heh, Scandi fish. That reminds me of my favorite Scandi fish eating video — http://moralauthority.wordpress.com/2007/10/06/the-ikea-commercial-that-youll-never-see/

16. mesablue - November 30, 2007

I like head cheese, with a little mustard on rye bread. Yumm.

17. Sobek - November 30, 2007

What the heck is going on here? Did you all get jobs or something?

18. dr4 - November 30, 2007

i just got back from a road trip. I drove two counties over – thats an hour each way – just to avoid paying a wheel tax. I forgot to mail the damn renewal in so it cost me more in time and gas than it would have to just pay my counties wheel tax.

Fuck that shit though. Im a republican for a reason.

19. mesablue - November 30, 2007

What is a wheel tax?

20. Retired Geezer - November 30, 2007

We have Smog Checks here in Idaho, well in Ada County we do.

Not here in Canyon County where Camp Geezer is located.

Ask the Vegas Dwellers about Smog Checks… Biggest ripoff evah.

21. dr4 - November 30, 2007

What is a wheel tax?

Its a tax that you have to pay for the “privilege” of driving.

Tag renewal $25
+
Wheel Tax $50
=
Amish lying about what county he lives in

We dont have a state income tax here, so they tax the shit out of everything else. Including food.

TN state sales tax = 7%
City/County sales tax = 2.25% – to 2.75%

So you pay nearly 10% extra for every item that you buy here. Plus all the Sin taxes we have.

The State of TN has started impounding cars of people who cross the state line and buy more than 2 cartons of cigarettes to try to avoid all the additional taxes on them.

http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-news/1902966/posts

This used to be a good place to live.

22. Bart - November 30, 2007

Smog checks sound a lot like Assachusetts’ annual inspection sticker, which checks vehicles for emissions, general condition, and for safety devices, i.e. blinkers, horn, seat belts, cracked winshield, etc.

$29/yr.

Get this, though: Diesel vehicles, SUVs, and older models are exempt from the emission test. So the biggest polluters are exempt from the state’s emission standards. Makes sense, no?

23. mesablue - November 30, 2007

Ah, in Michigan they just screw you on the tag renewal. It’s determined by the original purchase price of a new vehicle. My tags alone are $150.00. I just renewed mine on Tuesday, the local office had been closed (which I didn’t know) so I had to go to the next town over. Of course I got in an accident on the way there — some chick cut across four lanes of traffic to cut me off. Luckily a witness stuck around so the other driver got the ticket. So, this year my tags were VERY expensive.

We have state income tax 4.35%, city income tax 1.5%, sales tax 6% and now a new service tax of 6% that goes into effect tomorrow unless our state legislature can get it’s act together.

24. mesablue - November 30, 2007

Oh, and our gas and sin taxes are some of the highest in the nation. Our gas prices have been higher than California’s this past year. Gas is $3.30 a gallon in my neck of the woods right now and a pack of cigarettes is $5.50 just about everywhere.

25. mesablue - November 30, 2007

Combined with the country’s worst unemployment and business climate — hey, let’s just raise taxes higher! Makes sense, right?

26. eddiebear - November 30, 2007

^and yet, Granholm was reelected. I don’t get that one.

27. mesablue - November 30, 2007

One word — Detroit.

Well, actually two words — Detroit and women.

the city of Detroit and women across the state voted overwhelmingly for Granholm.

28. dr4 - November 30, 2007

“in Michigan they just screw you on the tag renewal. It’s determined by the original purchase price of a new vehicle.”

where the hell do they come up with this stuff? Theyre givin you the business.

oh and It looks like Sparkles love affair with McCain may be over. A new man may have caught her eye – Huck.

Because he loves Jesus.

I think if this guy gets the nomination its going to be the end of the Republican party as we know it.

http://rightwingsparkle.blogspot.com/2007/11/amazing-race-of-mike-huckabee.html

29. sandy burger - November 30, 2007

On the bright side, if Huckabee gets the nomination, it’ll create more common ground between me and my liberal friends.

30. dr4 - November 30, 2007

will he be stopped, ya think?

I think he is the biggest reason Fred has done so poorly. Most of the more religious people who would have gone for him over Rudy have instead gone to the guy who cant finish a sentence without mentioning the Bible.

31. mesablue - November 30, 2007

Back on topic, I have two Omaha Steak New York strips and some bacon. Would it be wrong to wrap the strips in bacon and then throw them on the grill? I’ve done the bacon wrapped filet thing, but the bacon only wraps around the side. Steaks completely wrapped in bacon — sounds like a no lose situation.

32. The Millennial Lutheran Church - November 30, 2007

I’m afraid of expired milk, lime jello and Tuna Casserole.

During the Lutheran Millenium™, you will not be required to ingest expired milk. However, lime jello and tuna casserole (made with noodles and Campbell’s Cream of Mushroom Soup) will be the staple diet in the reeducation camps.

This is for your own good. You will thank us when you “see the light” and graduate as a dedicated Lutheran.

33. dr4 - November 30, 2007

Would it be wrong to wrap the strips in bacon and then throw them on the grill?

Not unless your a Muslim or a Hindu. Or a Vegan.

It does sound good. I might try that myself. Besides, my blood has been rushing through my arteries just a little too fast for my liking lately so I think this should take care of that little problem.

I posted a link to a recipe for an entire turkey wrapped in bacon the other day so you should be good to go.

http://www.seriouseats.com/required_eating/2007/11/bacon-wrapped-turkey-recipe.html

34. Eisenhower - November 30, 2007

Hmmmmmm, warm Mayo.

Hmmmmmm. Warm Mamie!

35. sandy burger - November 30, 2007

will he be stopped, ya think?

I don’t know… My guess is, maybe by a Republican, otherwise probably by a Democrat.

Oh well. To be honest, I think that the 2008 election is less important than the 2004 election was, anyhow. And if the Democrats win, maybe the liberals will bring their incessant screeching down a decibel or two for a while, which would be nice.

36. BrewFan - November 30, 2007

tuna casserole (made with noodles and Campbell’s Cream of Mushroom Soup) will be the staple diet in the reeducation camps.

Not bad, but I still plan on converting my Lutheran overlords to Christianity.

37. Mr Minority - November 30, 2007

During the Lutheran Millenium™…However, lime jello and tuna casserole (made with noodles and Campbell’s Cream of Mushroom Soup) will be the staple diet in the reeducation camps.

Thank God, I am going to be raptured before then!!

38. mesablue - November 30, 2007

The bacon that I have is left over from T-Day — I made the bacon wrapped turkey. It was very good. Looked awesome as well.

39. sandy burger - November 30, 2007

What is Jello, anyhow? Isn’t it pretty much candied bone marrow?

40. dr4 - November 30, 2007

Was it better than just a plain old turkey or was it just a nice change?

What the heck is peppercorn bacon anyway? Is it the type of bacon that Arbys has?

41. Michael - November 30, 2007

#37 is fixed.

Jeez, Mr. M. I’m putting this in your file. You’re not going to be let out of the reeducation camps until you figure out how to use italics tags.

42. dr4 - November 30, 2007

“What is Jello, anyhow? Isn’t it pretty much candied bone marrow?”

yep.

43. Michael - November 30, 2007

The bone marrow of unrepentant Calvinists is suitable for making lime jello.

*glares at Brewfan*

44. BrewFan - November 30, 2007

🙂

45. sandy burger - November 30, 2007

Huh. Apparently Michael took those “an toi” comments literally.

46. mesablue - November 30, 2007

It was a lot better than regular turkey. Subtle flavor change, and very moist. Plus, the bacon itself was a great snack. The recipe that I used called for the bacon to be added after the turkey skin had already browned, so I got crispy skin, crispy bacon and very moist, slightly smokey turkey.

47. BrewFan - November 30, 2007

Huh. Apparently Michael took those “an toi” comments literally.

I like to leave messages for Michael in different languages. For example look over here.

48. PattyAnn - November 30, 2007

DRamish, I don’t know what kind of bacon Arby’s has, but peppercorn bacon here is Wright’s™ thick-sliced peppered bacon and one edge is covered with the cracked peppercorns.
Best.Bacon.Ever.

49. Mr Minority - November 30, 2007

Jeez, Mr. M. I’m putting this in your file. You’re not going to be let out of the reeducation camps until you figure out how to use italics tags.

Beat me, flog me, make me eat lime jello, I am sick and tired of i tags!!

50. Michael - November 30, 2007

Huh. Apparently Michael took those “an toi” comments literally.

Actually, I take some pride in doing this right:

Brewfan — ăn tôi!!!

The HTML for the circumflex over the “o” is easy to find, but that Vietnamese symbol over the “a” is not. I just have to copy it.

51. mesablue - November 30, 2007

Bacon wrapped New York strips — the before.

52. PattyAnn - November 30, 2007

mesa, looks delish. What sides are we having?

53. mesablue - November 30, 2007

During — http://img253.imageshack.us/img253/8384/dsc01454va2.jpg

The damned grill was out of propane, so I had to do them on the stove. Don’t think it will matter.

54. BrewFan - November 30, 2007

Aren’t those steaks done yet?

55. mesablue - November 30, 2007
56. mesablue - November 30, 2007

Want a bite?

57. Lipstick - November 30, 2007

And if the Democrats win, maybe the liberals will bring their incessant screeching down a decibel or two for a while, which would be nice.

Sandy, it’s better to have them screeching than governing. One is amusing, the other is scary.

58. dr4 - November 30, 2007

found a website with a bunch of quality pics of classic hollywood stars today.

I have to say that Lucille Ball was quite doable when she was younger.

Lauren Bacall on the other hand was a mannish skank. What the hell was Bogart thinking?

59. James - November 30, 2007

I’m not even sure what to think of this…

60. BrewFan - November 30, 2007

James, when you’re hanging around IB its better *not* to think.

61. Michael - November 30, 2007

James, you must reach deep within yourself and let your Kundalini rise in order to understand the spiritual significance of our comment threads.

62. mesablue - December 1, 2007

No one wants my steak?

Oh well, the food coma has just about worn off. That’s about a once in a year meal.

63. Lipstick - December 1, 2007

Oh your steak looked wonderful — did you save me any?

64. Retired Geezer - December 1, 2007

Beat me, flog me, make me eat lime jello, I am sick and tired of i tags!!

Yeah, too bad our WP comments template doesn’t have a couple of buttons for bold, italic and links.

65. Retired Geezer - December 1, 2007

See-Dub said, I’ve had the mouse wine.

Which made me think about this:

Waiter: Would you like the mouse wine?

Me: (*thinking* House wine is usually not expensive). Yeah sure.

Hilarity ensues.

66. spenn - December 1, 2007

#8
You are absolutely correct. These dishes must have been invented during desperate times. Nowadays, these gastronomical horrors have been cunningly renamed “traditional christmas dishes”.

Scroll down here for pic + description of “SMALAHOVUD”:

http://www.bjorkasen.no/bcd/bcd0-99/food.htm

67. Muslihoon - December 1, 2007

Smalahovud can we eat as Christmas food, with potatoes and mashed swedes

Ah! Evidence those Scandis are not only evil but cannibals to boot!

68. dr4 - December 1, 2007

“Ah! Evidence those Scandis are not only evil but cannibals to boot!”

brilliant

69. Lipstick - December 1, 2007

I’m going to Norway next summer, where I will enjoy the scenery and avoid the food!

🙂

70. Michael - December 1, 2007

Spenn at #66, by the way, is apparently a Norwegian lurker who actually has IB (and AOSHQ) on his blogroll, and who linked this post.

So Spenn, let me just explain that we joke about dirty stinkin’ Scandis out of love, with no malice in our hearts. I’ve been to Norway and thought it was a wonderful place. We really only despise the filthy degenerate Spudders from Idaho.

71. Michael - December 1, 2007

By the way, Spenn, if you see a female American tourist next summer with enormous feet — that’s Lipstick.

72. Lipstick - December 1, 2007

Spenn, if there are any Norwegian wine festivals that have grape-stomping contests, I’m your girl.

73. Retired Geezer - December 1, 2007

We really only despise the filthy degenerate Spudders from Idaho.

You’d be fools not to.

74. Mrs. Peel - December 1, 2007

Let the record show that obsessively keeping every file from undergrad is a good thing. I just saved myself I don’t even know how much time on this project, because I already had an M file for a polynomial regression from my old Theoretical Analysis course. Whoop!

75. Lipstick - December 1, 2007

I already had an M file for a polynomial regression from my old Theoretical Analysis course.

I’ve still got my papers from Renaissance Lit class. Just in case, uh, um. . . Never mind.

76. kevlarchick - December 1, 2007

I still have my Shakespeare text. I use it as a doorstop.

77. daveintexas - December 1, 2007

I learned about Beowulf… in the middle or old Englay.

God that was a bitch.

78. Michael - December 1, 2007

I just saved myself I don’t even know how much time on this project, because I already had an M file for a polynomial regression from my old Theoretical Analysis course. Whoop!

Whoop!!! That is so cool.

Wait, what the heck is an “M file”?

79. Lipstick - December 1, 2007

That was written in Middle English.

*showing off*

80. Michael - December 1, 2007

OK, English scholars, how does this sentence end?

The best laid schemes of mice and men . . .

Everybody has heard the first half of that sentence. Almost nobody knows how it how it ends, because the ending is Germanic.

81. Michael - December 1, 2007

Mrs. Peel is disqualified from answering, because she is a Steinbeck fanatic.

82. Bart - December 1, 2007

The best laid schemes of mice and men . . .

makes a man healthy, wealthy, and wise.

Or some shit.

83. Mrs. Peel - December 1, 2007

Germanic? I thought it was Scots. Wasn’t Robbie Burns Scottish? *looks around in confusion*

An M file is a Matlab code file. I heart Matlab. It’s a very cool program designed for matrix mathematics, so it’s about the best application out there for manipulation of very large sets of data and applying filters and signal analysis and such.

84. dr4 - December 1, 2007

go oft awry?

or something that looks or sounds like that…i think.

is this some kind of trick question?

I thought this was part of a poem by Burns. Its german?

85. dr4 - December 1, 2007

fuck peel beat me to it.

86. Michael - December 1, 2007

I thought this was part of a poem by Burns. Its german?

No, it’s English about a century after Shakespeare, which was still highly Germanic 500 years after the Norman conquest (the Angles and Saxons were Germanic invaders of Britain, from whence our language derives). Burns was Scottish, but the poem was English, not Scots.

go oft awry? or something that looks or sounds like that…i think.

You think right. The answer is . . . gang aft aglae.

87. Michael - December 1, 2007

Brother-In-Law Michael is just finishing his doctoral dissertation in Middle English, btw, the English that evolved after 1066. It’s very German, despite the French influence.

88. Retired Geezer - December 1, 2007

We just finished watching “Amazing Grace” again. Albert Finney didn’t have a very big part but he frickin’ kicks ass.

I guess he’s one of my favorite actors.

BTW, I almost knew “gang aft aglae”… I knew the first two words anyway.

89. dr4 - December 1, 2007

so what does it mean? Does it translate to something like ‘go oft awry’ or does it just sort sound like it should fit so we go with?

Is Scots not a germanic language? English is,right? Im just guessing cause its not one of the Romantic languages.

Anybody here actually able to finish a James Joyce novel? Did you understand any of it?

90. BrewFan - December 1, 2007

We just finished watching Bridge to Teribithia. Not too bad.

91. dr4 - December 1, 2007

I wanted to see Amazing Grace when i thought it was just about the life of John Newton. I think that would make a pretty good movie in and of itself. Lost interest when i found out that that was not what the movie was about.

Finney was great in Big Fish. Also good in Murder on the Orient Express.

92. daveintexas - December 1, 2007

gang aft aglay, if I recall correctly.

93. dr4 - December 1, 2007

Newsflash: We Finally Landed on the Moon!!!

94. Michael - December 1, 2007

Yes, Amish, it means “often go awry.”

95. Sobek - December 1, 2007

I read A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man. I understood it (mostly), but it’s one of his shortest, and I’ve heard it’s the least whacked out.

96. Mrs. Peel - December 1, 2007

And yes, I did know, but Michael didn’t let me answer. *sulks*

97. Lipstick - December 1, 2007

I think I read the Cliff’s Notes on that one.

98. BrewFan - December 1, 2007

The very first ‘adult’ novel I remember reading was The Fires of Spring. I’ve read most everything by Michener since then but that one always will hold a special place in my heart.

Don’t ask me how or why this came to mind, because I don’t know.

99. Michael - December 1, 2007

Is Scots not a germanic language?M

Nah, I think Scots is one of those barbaric Celtic languages, like Gaelic.

100. Muslihoon - December 1, 2007

Getting back on topic, I just had bhejaa (also known as maghaz) at a Pakistani restaurant last night. It’s one of my favorite dishes. The listing on the menu is a better reflection of what it is: Brain Masala. (Masala refers simply to a mix of spices. This is a key addition to the name of the dish because brain is also often unmixed with spices is sometimes added to certain foods, such as nehari.)

It’s one of those foods where I learned what is in it only after coming to like it. A bit like eel sushi.

Another such desi dish is katakat. I have no idea what’s in it, but from what I’ve heard, it’s not all that appetizing. But it is delicious indeed!

A very popular dish is paaya (which, for some odd reason, we pronounce like the English word “pie”). All I know is that it’s very sticky, has little to no meat (usually), and involves the feet of an animal (but you can’t tell feet are involved from what’s in the dish).

Of course, considering the number of spices we add to stuff, anything can be made to taste good. How people can survive on bland “exotic” foods escapes me. But that’s my cultural bias showing. (That said, the discussion on chili–particularly the need for it to be as hot as possible–has disabused me of the presumption that Americans don’t like hot or spicy foods.)

101. Michael - December 1, 2007

Yep, I just googled it. Cornish and Welsh are also Celtic.

102. Lipstick - December 1, 2007

So is Breton.

I love this stuff.

I also admire Mrs. Peel for studying things I could never understand. (Math/Science part of my brain is missing — no matter how hard I tried it just didn’t compute.)

103. Lipstick - December 1, 2007

I used to work with a guy from northern Spain whose last name was “Obregon”.

He said some Celts ended up there and his name was the Spanish variation of “O’Brien”.

104. Muslihoon - December 1, 2007

Welsh is interesting. Half the words seem unpronounceable because what we consider to be consonants (especially “w” and “y”) are used as vowels or semi-vowels.

Irish Gaelic has the opposite problems: so many vowels. Plus consonant combinations are pronounced in ways we may not expect. For example “Siobhan” is pronounced sho-van. (“Bh” and “mh” are pronounced as “v”, “dh” and “gh” are pronounced “gh”, “fh” is silent, “ph” is “f”, “th” and “sh” are “h”; and the pronunciation of each consonant or applicable consonant cluster actually changes depending on the surrounding vowels (whether they’re slender or broad).) “Prime Minister” is “Taoiseach”, pronounced “tee-shukh”.

I hear you, Lipstick, about the math and science.

105. Michael - December 1, 2007

I think Musli should come to the IBSBP and cook up some of those spicy brains he’s talkin’ about. Sounds yummy. That brain dish would nicely complement Dave’s Afterburner Chili, which Cathy is making.

(Frickin’ zombie. No wonder the Pakistanis can’t find Osama. They’re too busy eating brains! They must be slow-zombies.)

106. Lipstick - December 1, 2007

Maybe that’s why Musli is so smart.

107. Muslihoon - December 1, 2007

*blush* Why, thank you!

108. Michael - December 1, 2007

I also admire Mrs. Peel for studying things I could never understand.

Well, she just tries too hard.

The Methodists have a peculiar doctrine of sanctification, which harks back to John Wesley. They officially believe in the possible achievement of perfection, i.e., the extinction of original sin, in this life.

*Michael sips his bourbon and puffs a cigarette*

That’s just foolish.

*changing subject*

Say, Mrs. Peel, did you like “Travels With Charley”?

That was a quirky little Steinbeck book, prior to interstate highways and RVs. I really enjoyed it. Steinbeck on blue highways, with a dog.

109. Michael - December 2, 2007

The main thing I remember about “Travels With Charley” is that Steinbeck had a clever system for doing his laundry, which involved garbage cans, soap, and water, along with the agitation supplied by the vibration of the road on his tires.

110. Retired Geezer - December 2, 2007

Didnt even realize that Dane Cook was in it.

I thought that Dane Cook ‘Sneeze’ bit was pretty funny.

We just watched “Murder on the Orient Express’ again tonight. Albert Finney kicks ass.
That’s the 2nd AF movie in 2 days.
Next we watch “Wolfen” if I can find it at the video store.

111. Retired Geezer - December 2, 2007

I must have slid through a Time Warp. I commented on Amish’s post and now I’m ahead of him.

112. Innumerable force of spirits armed that durst dislike His reign and Amish preferring - December 2, 2007

Rambling Mess:

i read a bunch of steinbeck stuff when i was a kid. Liked a lot of it. Didnt care for Travels with Charley. Cant really remember why, it was so long ago.

I did read a collection of his personal correspondence and short articles that was pretty interesting.

Grapes of Wrath: I thought that the vignettes between the chapters concerning the main story were some of the best parts. Kris Kristofferson wrote a shitty song about the truckstop scene called “Here Comes that Rainbow Again.”

I liked the Tortilla Flat is one of his that doesnt get as much credit as it deserves.

I finally got around to watching Mr Brooks. It was very good. It was what American Psycho should have been. Didnt even realize that Dane Cooke was in it.

113. PattyAnn - December 2, 2007

#66 = Sean Spenn & Matt Demon
GLAR

114. Sobek - December 2, 2007

I just finished Spakespeare’s The Winter’s Tale, and realized why it’s not one of his more famous plays.

115. A sad tale's best for winter - I have one of sprites and amish - December 2, 2007

Shakespeare – he’s good.

116. Retired Geezer - December 2, 2007

I’m planning on watching (Mel Gibson’s) Hamlet this week.

117. Sleep no more. Amish does murder sleep. - December 2, 2007

oh you said NOT good. Nevermind. shit im drunk.

Look dude, Most comedies arent funny for more than ten years. Animal House – funny as hell…in 1978. Now it sucks. ALF? Home Improvement? Crap. But just like in Animal House or Caddyshack or in fucking Shakespeare you can still appreciate the craft of a well written joke or clever line even after the funny has worn off.

Its hard to write a joke that people can identify with 400 years down the line. Tragedies on the other hand are timeless.

Fuck im tired.

118. Michael - December 2, 2007

Shakespeare – he’s good

Yeah, he’s OK, but he’s not Tom Clancy.

119. Polonius - December 2, 2007

planning on watching (Mel Gibson’s) Hamlet this week.

Im gettin’ too old for this.

120. Polonius - December 2, 2007

goin to bed folks.

night

121. Muslihoon - December 2, 2007

Robin Hood: Men in Tights: cracks me up even now.

As we all know, along with medicine, gravity, and the unique application of personal explosives, Muslims discovered and/or invented English literature. It is painfully obvious that “Shakespeare” is but a modest pen name of the very legendary (so legendary no one has heard of him) Sheikh az-Zubair. From Iraq. (Google can’t lie.)

See? Bushhitlermcchimpyburton wants to attack Iraq because he doesn’t like English literature.

122. Mrs. Peel - December 2, 2007

Travels with Charley was pretty good, as I remember. I’ve read that one only once.

Lips, thanks, but I just study what I like, same as everyone else. Just so happens that I like engineering. It’s neither a virtue nor a vice.

Well, maybe it is a vice. True story: This evening, the boy and my parents and I were examining a magazine ad for this (my grandma has a bum knee), and I stared at the crude sketch (it’s not on that website) for a few moments before announcing, “You know, they call this the ‘Archimedes Bath Lift,’ and yet the drawing doesn’t show any water being displaced when the person is lowered into the bath.”

And then everyone laughed at me.

123. Sobek - December 2, 2007

Amish, it’s not the jokes that were the problem (I cracked up at some of the dirty geography jokes in Comedy of Errors, so yeah, I appreciate that the man can write).

It’s the ludicrously contrived plot.

It’s the fact that the big reconciliation part in the penultimate scene takes place entirely off stage, while three extras we’ve never seen before walk on stage and tell us how great they heard it was.

It’s the fact that, totally out of nowhere, with no explanation whatsoever, the statue comes to life.

It’s the fact that we’re supposed to be happy that Leontes didn’t lose his wife after all (sorta), and conveniently forget his son, Mamilius.

And Mrs. Peel, you’re a serious dork.

124. Muslihoon - December 2, 2007

Do tube lights in America flicker?

In Pakistan, tube lights are extensively used. But whenever one is turned on (especially in older buildings) it flickers for a few minutes before it turns on in earnest. Because of the delayed activation, a “tube light joke” refers to when a joke is told but it takes some time before it clicks.

Mrs. Peel’s Archimedes comment was a little like that. (Not a tube light joke, per se: more of a tube light moment. Feh. I’m beginning to feel old.)

125. Muslihoon - December 2, 2007

How do you pronounce the “ch” in “deus ex machina”? “K”? “Ch”? “Sh”?

126. Mrs. Peel - December 2, 2007

Fluorescent lights? Yeah, the ones in some of the older buildings at work do that.

Well, the boy laughed hysterically, while my parents had to have the comment repeated. It didn’t help that he started laughing almost as soon as I finished saying “Archimedes,” because he knew where I was going. You see why I love him.

dictionary.com says it’s a hard K.

127. Michael - December 2, 2007

“sh”

128. Michael - December 2, 2007

“sh”

I take that back. I looked it up, and Mrs. Peel is right. Hard K.

129. geoff - December 2, 2007

The main thing I remember about “Travels With Charley” is that Steinbeck

…was the most self-aggrandizing elitist mega-lib to ever write a paen to his inability to drive cross-country competently.

Re-read it about a year ago. What a coast-to-coast jerk.

130. geoff - December 2, 2007

Kind of inebriated, BTW, so that may have come off as a bit harsh.

131. Lipstick - December 2, 2007

Nah, it was good.

132. Retired Geezer - December 2, 2007

Looking for a Christmas gift for the special someone?
Here’s a perfect gift for Mrs. Peel or The Boy.

Or any of the other IB Geeks.

133. Anonymous - December 2, 2007

the 1948 version of Hamlet with Laurence Olivier was on TCM last night. Didnt watch it though. It was already after 1 and the movie is about 3 hours long.

134. Sandra_Dalene_VanAlstine - August 1, 2009

Sandra Dalene VanAlstine – Wanted to introduce myself

Thanks
Sandra Dalene VanAlstine


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