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“Non Est Hic Surrexit Enim Sicut Dixit Venite Videte Locum Ubi Positus Erat Dominus” April 3, 2010

Posted by Edward von Bear in Family, News, Personal Experiences, Religion.
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He is risen, Alleluia!

and

Behold, the bonds of Death and Despair have been forever broken on this night. The Light has broken the Darkness, as Jesus of Nazareth has risen from the Dead, fulfilled the prophecies of old, and granted to all of us the gift of Eternal Life.

I know the last year or so has been tough on a lot of us, including our little online community. But so long as we believe our Eternal Gift awaits us, Death and Sadness will never win.

Comments»

1. Michael - April 3, 2010

Alleluia! He is risen indeed.

2. xbradtc - April 3, 2010

Alleluia! He is risen indeed.

Even if Eddie is jumping the gun a wee bit.

3. Michael - April 3, 2010

Even if Eddie is jumping the gun a wee bit.

Not really. All we know is that the resurrection occurred sometime between sundown on Friday, by which time Jesus was hastily interred before the sabbath started, and Sunday morning when the empty tomb was discovered. It could have happened any time after sundown on Saturday, when the sabbath was over. That seems to be the assumption of the Exsultet that Eddie posted.

4. Michael - April 3, 2010

And, by the way, when Eddie put up that post, the sun was down in Jerusalem and the sabbath was over.

5. Heard Somewhere in the Netherworld - April 3, 2010

“psst. Dad! Hey, over here. Did you say 2 days or 3?”

“3.”

“Ok, I got it, thanks!”

6. Cathy - April 3, 2010

Thanks, Eddie.

Hugs all ’round.

Michael - April 3, 2010

Jewish days were reckoned from sundown to sundown, not midnight to midnight like we do it.

There is no way to account for the idea that Jesus was dead for three 24-hour periods. He wasn’t. He was missing on Sunday morning. The biblical account that he was dead during “three days” means part of Friday, all of Saturday, and part of Sunday (which, for Jews, starts on Saturday at sundown).

That’s kinda why we know that sundown on Saturday in Jerusalem is the earliest possible time for the resurrection, because you have to pick up at least a portion of three days to make sense of the text.

Also, God had forbidden work on the sabbath, and Jews generally complied, so I doubt that Jesus, the ultimate keeper of the Law, would have undertaken the salvation of mankind on that day. I’m pretty sure he was dead until Saturday night, which, for Jews, would have been the beginning of a new day.

7. Cathy - April 3, 2010

Christ IS Risen, indeed!

8. Eddie The Bear - April 3, 2010

also, most Catholic Easter Vigils, where the Service of the Light begins the proceedings, commence (usually) anywhere from 4PM on.
http://www.catholicculture.org/culture/liturgicalyear/activities/view.cfm?id=1043

9. TXMarko - April 3, 2010

He is Risen, Indeed! 🙂

10. Michael - April 3, 2010

Also, for ancient Jews, the word “day” is inclusive. It does not mean 24 hours.

Compare to Isaiah’s concept of the “day of the Lord,” which refers the the entire end times of the church age, or the concept in Genesis, “there was evening and there was morning, one day.” This is describing the astonishing accomplishments of a God who is outside of time by referencing a Jewish day.

11. kevlarchick - April 3, 2010

The Easter Vigil began tonight at around 845pm. It is a very long Mass that begins in total darkness. It is a beautiful and powerful Mass when new Catholics enter the Church, as I did over ten years ago.

A fire is lit from the palm fronds from last years Palm Sunday, and all candles in the church are lit in the darkened church from that fire. The long exsultet is chanted, as it has been for probably a thousand years.

12. daveintexas - April 3, 2010

Do they get to use the Pot O Smoke™?

That’s a pretty cool thing about Catholics.

13. Michael - April 3, 2010

Do they get to use the Pot O Smoke™?

I think the Greek and Russian Orthodox do that too.

I’m kinda jealous. Lutherans don’t do that, because it would make us look Catholic. But the Pot O Smoke™ is pretty cool, if you think about it.

14. kevlarchick - April 3, 2010

Oh yes. More incense on this night than any other Mass of the entire year.
A good priest will get that smoke going until everyone’s eyes water for the whole Mass. Good stuff.

15. daveintexas - April 3, 2010

It’s a good thing they don’t let us use those things here. If I was in charge of it we’d all be baked halfway through the sermon.

and lunch would be goooooooooood.

16. BrewFan - April 3, 2010

Also, God had forbidden work on the sabbath, and Jews generally complied, so I doubt that Jesus, the ultimate keeper of the Law, would have undertaken the salvation of mankind on that day.

Is this ‘Pure Lutheran Doctrine’? I’m going to have fun in the camps!

Mark 2:23-28

17. daveintexas - April 3, 2010

Heh.

18. Michael - April 3, 2010

Brew, I said “generally” just because I knew you were going to bring that up.

19. Michael - April 3, 2010

And Jesus was making a point: “The sabbath was made for man, and not man for the sabbath.”

He was not saying that sabbath laws should be idly ignored. He was saying that religious rituals should not be an end unto themselves. When challenged by the Pharisees, he did not dispute the law, but used David’s breaking of a sabbath law as an example of his point.

20. daveintexas - April 3, 2010

>> but used David’s breaking of a sabbath law as an example of his point.

Hey, don’t drag me into it. All I did was grill a couple cheeseburgers.

21. Michael - April 3, 2010

Also, note that Jesus himself did not harvest grain on the sabbath. He was criticized for tolerating this activity by his disciples.

22. Michael - April 3, 2010

Hey, don’t drag me into it. All I did was grill a couple cheeseburgers.

Grilling cheeseburgers on the sabbath is OK, even under OT law. The Bible says so somewhere — I think it’s in the Book of Hezekiah.

23. Michael - April 3, 2010

I was right — it’s in Hezekiah. I looked it up.

Hezekiah 8:14:

Thus saith the Lord, “Upon the sabbath day, if a righteous man places animal flesh and cheese above burning coals, thusly to make food for the eating of it, and the animal flesh is not unclean, this shalt be OK with Me, the Lord God Almighty.”

24. cbullitt - April 3, 2010

Something for the Easter basket…after services.

http://tinyurl.com/ydmzsmv

25. TXMarko - April 4, 2010

Hezekiah 8:14:

What translation is THAT?!?

26. TXMarko - April 4, 2010

Sadly, the Hezekiah verses did not deal with the possibility of cooking with Propane.

27. nicedeb - April 4, 2010

Happy Easter, everyone.

28. Happy Easter « Nice Deb - April 4, 2010

[…] Innocent Bystanders : The Day Death Died and “Non Est Hic Surrexit Enim Sicut Dixit Venite Videte Locum Ubi Positus Erat Dominus” […]

29. Mrs. Peel - April 4, 2010

He is risen indeed! Alleluia!


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