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What’s Wrong With America October 23, 2010

Posted by Michael in Philosophy, Politics.
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I’m not saying that all this stuff is bad. It’s just not the purpose of our federal government and we don’t need pinheads in D.C. making six-figure incomes to get it done.

I’m going to elaborate on the above remark that I made in a comment thread below.

The vice of the last 80 years in America (meaning, since FDR) is that we began to believe the federal government exists to do good, rather than just fulfill its constitutionally appointed duties.  Thus, we looked to Washington, D.C. to get us through the Great Depression, resulting in the New Deal that, by all accounts, prolonged the Great Depression.

We did not learn from that mistake, preoccupied as we were by WWII.

Since then, we have routinely elected politicians like Johnson, Nixon, Bush, and Obama, and a horde of their ilk in Congress, all of whom were do-gooders, and prided themselves on tackling problems like poverty, education, a TV channel as cool as the BBC, the lack of electricity in Appalachia, AIDS in Africa, you name it.

Oh yeah, I forgot to mention racism.  That’s the Real Big Issue™ for the do-gooders.

They tackled that issue and made it worse.  They destroyed black families, functional black neighborhoods, and inner-city school systems.  Then they patted themselves on the back for their “equal opportunity” crusade, giving themselves credit for advances by blacks which the labor market would have accomplished more quickly and effectively without them.  They all had Ivy League degrees and good intentions.

We’re stuck with a culture where white people recoil in horror at the obscenities of black rappers, our jails fill up with young black men, and we despise their culture of single-moms, dependency, and victimization pimps like Al Sharpton and Jesse Jackson, both of whom expect us to accept their ludicrous claims to clergy status and political legitimacy rather than dismissing them as shake-down artists. Blacks are doomed to “the soft bigotry of low expectations,” a reality that propelled our current President to the White House on the basis of an amazingly thin resume, only to fail.

The problem is, the do-gooders in D.C. don’t actually have the ability to do any good unless they suck money from us into the federal government, and then send a portion of  it back with a bunch of regulations attached, and inevitably their programs designed by their smart Harvard grads don’t work.

Worse yet, unlike the states, they could accomplish this without any responsibility for balancing the books of the federal government, and without inciting a taxpayer revolt.

They could nationalize the Hubert Humphrey Do-Gooder Impulse™ for one, and only one, reason.

They controlled a fiat currency which happens to be the reserve currency for the rest of the planet. Everybody else was soaking up our debt.

That game is over.  The clock has run out for the do-gooder politicians.  China is thinking twice about increasing its exposure to U.S. Treasuries.  Everybody is looking sideways at the dollar.

That’s really what is behind the Tea Party. They are looking at the debt being imposed on their children, they are looking at the unreliability of the dollar, and they have a simple message for D.C.

STOP TRYING TO DO GOOD!

Comments»

1. Blackiswhite, Imperial Consigliere - October 22, 2010

Damn, Now it’s my turn to feel dirty.

Nice job, Batman.

2. hutch1200 - October 24, 2010

That’s the Real “F’ng” Big Issue™ for the do-gooders.
(Had to add the Biden thing in there fer ya)

3. lauraw - October 24, 2010

Hutch! You going to the Boston thing on the 13th?

4. Michael - October 24, 2010

That’s the Real “F’ng” Big Issue™ for the do-gooders.

Even the silliest amongst the libs have realized that Racism and Civil Rights and Equal Opportunity (meaning, racial preferences) have been played to death

People are sorta unhappy with the results, most especially all the school districts and neighborhoods, and even entire cities (Detroit, Hartford), that they destroyed. They won’t admit this, of course, and piously declaim at every opportunity that we “still have a looooooooong way to go” before we achieve a race-neutral society. (You have to ululate “long” to imitate their rhetoric.)

Never mind that a person of color and his wife are in the White House and having a hell of a good time playing golf on really nice courses, taking multiple vacations including during the Gulf oil spill, and otherwise jetting around the world on Air Force One with a huge entourage, while the economy is broken.

It also is not really hard to notice that people like Charles Rangel and Maxine Waters believe that they are exempt from the ethical obligations that apply to everyone else. We know why they think this; they are actually sorta explicit about this. They believe they get a free pass because of their skin color.

Reality is this — an enormous number of white Americans, like myself and Chimpy, have relatives who are not white, and we don’t even think twice about it. It’s normal. Interbreeding has inevitably accomplished what Congress could not. We don’t buy their constant whining about racism. Obama, and Tiger Woods, are actually sort of the exemplars of this phenomenon. Tiger had no problem banging as many blond bimbos as he wanted. Most of us white guys attributed this to his fame and money, and didn’t think his race was even relevant. We all experienced a twinge of jealousy.

I actually enjoy it when the Dems keep throwing the race card. They are just pushing themselves towards irrelevancy.

Most of them, I think, get this. That’s why they are flailing about to launch a new crusade for public health care, or saving the planet from global warming, or green jobs, or whatever other useless form of do-goodism that they can dream up.

5. Michael - October 24, 2010

Long story short: Racial politics was actually a positive force in the era of Martin Luther King, it was still OK under Lyndon Johnson, and then it got ugly thanks to race hustlers like Jesse Jackson and Al Sharpton, and their white cheerleaders.

6. Michael - October 24, 2010

If you are wondering why I am emotionally invested in the issue of racial politics — I can explain this.

I used to live in the inner city of St. Louis. The public schools were not an option. My kids went to a Lutheran parochial school.

As time went by, I had to consider where my kids would go to high school. The way it worked out for us, the best options were Catholic High Schools that were sex-segregated.

CATHOLIC HIGH SCHOOLS!!!!!!!!!!!

This meant that the best I could do for my children was to surrender them to the dominion of the Pope in Rome, where they would be brain-washed by by Jesuits or Marianists feeding them papal doctrine, and I would be hard-pressed to inculcate them with Pure Lutheran Doctrine™.

Jeebers. That was scary.

Fortunately, I got transferred to Texas and bought a home in a good public school district with a great band program, where they could play saxophones.

7. Michael - October 24, 2010

The saxophone, by the way, is the instrument which most closely approximates the human voice, and it’s really the instrument worth listening to in your average jazz quartet number, where everybody gets a turn doing a solo. Here is how it works out —

The drum solo:

BORING! Dude, I could bang on a trash can and its lid and be just as interesting. Are you actually trying to be as creative as Ina-Gadda-Davida?

The bass solo:

Give me a fucking break. I could thump on the shower room wall and produce a better beat. In fact, I have done that when the radio was on.

The guitar solo:

Bottom line — OK, you have some talent, but you are not Clapton. You will never be Clapton. Or Stevie Ray Vaughan, for that matter.

The sax solo:

Shit, you are blowing me away. Jazz saxophone is awesome.

8. geoff - October 24, 2010

The saxophone, by the way, is the instrument which most closely approximates the human voice

Whereas the trumpet (as my kinda famous band director used to say) most closely approximates God’s voice.

9. Michael - October 24, 2010

The trumpet, especially in the hands of an inexperienced operator, most closely approximates the voice of a goose getting strangled to death.

10. Michael - October 24, 2010

Actually, Geoff, I had the experience of listening to Maynard Ferguson at Blues Alley in Georgetown.

That guy could nearly knock you off your chair with the big wail of his trumpet.

11. geoff - October 24, 2010

That guy could nearly knock you off your chair with the big wail of his trumpet.

I’ve got my kids hooked on Maynard now. It was easier than I thought it would be.

12. geoff - October 24, 2010

The trumpet, especially in the hands of an inexperienced operator, most closely approximates the voice of a goose getting strangled to death.

Kind of ironic, given that that’s the impression I’m getting from my daughter at this very moment as she practices her sax (she started in September).

13. Michael - October 24, 2010

I’ve got my kids hooked on Maynard now. It was easier than I thought it would be.

What I noticed about Maynard is that his cheeks puffed out like balloons while he was playing. His art was unschooled. He had not been trained in circular breathing.

Kind of ironic, given that that’s the impression I’m getting from my daughter at this very moment as she practices her sax

Novice sax players sound like they are killing ducks, not geese. Trust me. I have been through many hours of this. I have attended the concerts. I have listened to my son do a “jazz solo” which left a bloodied and lifeless duck on the front of the stage.

14. geoff - October 24, 2010

He had not been trained in circular breathing.

He eventually went to India and learned it. He used to hold high notes forever.

Novice sax players sound like they are killing ducks, not geese.

I think she’s branching out in the avian world. No fowl is safe.

15. Michael - October 24, 2010

He eventually went to India and learned it. He used to hold high notes forever.

That was his trademark. It was frickin’ amazing to see him do it live. It was inhuman. When I saw him, he unleashed with “Conquistador.”

16. geoff - October 24, 2010

That was his trademark. It was frickin’ amazing to see him do it live. It was inhuman.

He holds a note in Shaft for forever, too. Conquistadore was not one of his most popular albums, but it did have his version of Gonna Fly Now, which I’ve heard on one of the sports shows.

17. geoff - October 24, 2010

But if you want hilarious screech trumpet, try the Tastee Bros. Especially this delightful selection.

18. Dave in Texas - October 24, 2010

>> Al Sharpton and Jesse Jackson

I thought they were Lutherns.

Also, regarding puffy cheeks, and neck, see: Dizzy Gillespie.

He invented it.

19. hutch1200 - October 24, 2010

Hutch! You going to the Boston thing on the 13th?–Lauraw.
Hell yeah! Unless, that is your excuse for NOT going.

20. skinbad - October 25, 2010

Whenever I read or hear “fiat currency” I get the shivering douche chills and tune out.

21. lauraw - October 25, 2010

Awesome, hutch!

I didn’t know you were a member on the Moron messageboard thingy.

22. TXMarko - October 25, 2010

That guy could nearly knock you off your chair with the big wail of his trumpet.

Some good Band friends and I saw Maynard at an outdoor concert at Vanderbilt in the mid-70’s.

He had just released Primal Scream.

Good times.

23. Do-Gooders « Think Tankers - October 29, 2010

[…] Posted on October 29, 2010 by Dex Michael at Innocent Bystanders has a great post up on what happens when politicians from doing their jobs to doing “good” and he focuses in […]


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